Archive for July, 2013

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Stress News
PTSD after traumatic events: Which teens are at risk?
Researchers have identified risk factors for children exposed to trauma in developing PTSD from analyzing 6,483 teen–parent pairs from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a survey of the prevalence and correlates of mental disorders in the United States. 61 percent of the teens (ages 13 to 17) had been exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. Nineteen percent had experienced three or more such events.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Bipolar Disorder News
Genetic link to attempted suicide identified
A study of thousands of people with bipolar disorder suggests that genetic risk factors may influence the decision to attempt suicide. Researchers have identified a small region on chromosome 2 that is associated with increased risk for attempted suicide. This small region contains four genes, including the ACP1 gene, and the researchers found more than normal levels of the ACP1 protein in the brains of people who had committed suicide. This protein is thought to influence the same biological pathway as lithium, a medication known to reduce the rate of suicidal behavior.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Bipolar Disorder News
Neuroimaging may offer new way to diagnose bipolar disorder
MRI may be an effective way to diagnose mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, according to experts.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Stress News
‘Love hormone’ is two-faced: Oxytocin strengthens bad memories and can increase fear and anxiety
Oxytocin is known as the hormone that promotes feelings of love, bonding and well-being. It’s even being tested as an anti-anxiety drug. But new research shows oxytocin also can cause emotional pain. Oxytocin appears to be the reason stressful social situations, perhaps being bullied at school or tormented by a boss, reverberate long past the event and can trigger fear and anxiety in the future. That’s because the hormone actually strengthens social memory in the brain.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Stress News
Optimists better at regulating stress
It’s no surprise that those who tend to see a rose’s blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals’ biological stress response — until now.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Stress News
Females respond better to stress because of estrogen in the brain, animal study finds
The idea that females are more resilient than males in responding to stress is a popular view, and now researchers have found a scientific explanation.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

ScienceDaily: Stress News
Stressful life events may increase stillbirth risk, study finds
Pregnant women who experienced financial, emotional, or other personal stress in the year before their delivery had an increased chance of having a stillbirth, say researchers.

Boise Bipolar Center, Charles K. Bunch, Ph.D, Boise Idaho Therapist Mental health photo 2168_zps680c452f.jpg