Archive for February, 2014

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
In Just 2 Minutes, This Video Will Make You Want To Go Out And Start Really Living
We can all use a little reminder to stop ignoring our dreams.

The video above from social networking site Posibl. does just that. Consider this a two-minute burst of inspiration — a quick push to keep going after what’s important to you.

“Your wildest dream is closer than you think,” the video’s narrator says.

We couldn’t agree more.

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The Best Foods For Headaches

Posted: February 28, 2014 in balance

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

Health and Fitness – The Huffington Post
The Best Foods For Headaches
Experts agree that knowing your triggers is one of the best ways to avoid the searing or pounding pain of a headache.

Triggers can be diet-related, and chronic headache sufferers often learn which eats and drinks are best for them to avoid. But if certain foods are off limits, are there also foods that help?

The evidence is less convincing, but there are a few potential pain-savers. The six foods below probably won’t make a headache disappear completely, but they do seem to have preventive powers.

Do any of these work for you? Let us know in the comments below.

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Relationships News — ScienceDaily
Does your iPod make you socially isolated? Study suggests it might
The effects that iPod use has on society and social interaction are the topic of a new study. Results showed that iPod users may or may not listen to their devices in public situations with the intention to prevent social engagement, but because others perceive it as a sign that the user does not want to interact, it has become a social barrier. The study raises questions about what impact this behavior, and the perception of it, may have on society. iPods, smart phones, tablets and other personal entertainment devices continue to grow in number; by plugging ourselves in to these modes of technology every day, are we intentionally closing ourselves off to social interaction?

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Relationships News — ScienceDaily
Pointing is infants’ first communicative gesture
Researchers have studied the acquisition and development of language in babies on the basis of the temporary coordination of gestures and speech. The results are the first in showing how and when they acquire the pattern of coordination between the two elements which allows them to communicate very early on.

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#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

Health and Fitness – The Huffington Post
What Key Ingredient In Beer, Wine And Whiskey Is Out To Get You? (VIDEO)
It’s in beer, whiskey, wine, and just about any food somewhat related to bread.

Oh, and it is out to get you.

At least that’s what the guys from Nature Hates You think about — you guessed it — yeast.

This week, the YouTube channel dedicated to showing you all the ways “Earth unleashes its vengeance” tackled one of the most popular ingredients in the average person’s diet. Along with yeast infections in humans, and the ways it can hurt your pet’s digestive system, yeast also has a frightening ability to reproduce.

If you’re a drinker or just someone that enjoys pizza, this video is definitely something you should see. You may even learn a thing or two about cloning

Want to read more from HuffPost Taste? Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Tumblr.

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Relationships News — ScienceDaily
Did you hear the one about the doctor? Using Facebook to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues
Researchers studied jokes made about doctors posted on Facebook in a new review that demonstrates the potential of using social networking sites for research on health and medicine. “Social networking sites, such as Facebook, have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues,” said the lead author. Results showed that jokes in which the doctor (or the healthcare system) was the butt of the joke tended to be more successful, although the association was not statistically significant. Interestingly, the joke in the study that received the greatest number of Facebook likes was a “doctor, lawyer, priest joke” in which the lawyer was the butt of the joke.

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How to Be Your Own Inspiration

Posted: February 28, 2014 in balance

#ptsd #posttrauma #trauma #bully

GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
How to Be Your Own Inspiration
Have you ever compared yourself to someone with thoughts like: “Why can’t I be successful like she is?” or “I wish I was smart like him.” We all have.

Gotta Love That Brain

Usually, those sorts of thoughts just make us feel insecure, sad or jealous, right? So why do we have them? It’s because our brains are hardwired to figure where we stand in the social pecking order. It’s a primitive survival strategy that says, “If I’m more powerful, then I’ll live to pass on my genes.”

I Want Jennifer Aniston’s Hair

Trouble is, having a fabulous haircut or a nice car doesn’t do much for ensuring the survival of the species anymore. But since comparing ourselves to others is programmed into our thinking, it’s hard to shut it off.

Instead, we need some strategies to gently redirect our thoughts. One of the best strategies I’ve found comes from a story I heard about a now-famous Broadway dancer.

Lessons From A Dancer

As a young girl growing up in Brooklyn, this novice dancer was frustrated by her stumbles and missteps in class, so she asked her dance teacher when she’d be able to move like the other students at the studio.

The teacher told her, “Don’t look at the other girls. You’re not in competition with them. You’re in competition with yourself. Your goal is to be better than you were yesterday, not better than the other girls.”

When I heard that story, I immediately saw an image in my mind.

Blinders.

Thinking About Horses

Growing up near New York City, the closest I got to horses was the Macy’s Day Parade on television, but I recalled that the horses wore blinders — small shields near their eyes that kept them focused on the path ahead without getting distracted by what was around them. Turns out, these blinders keep the horses calmer and when they run, they do it faster and better.

So what if we could wear blinders too — sort of metaphorically — to keep us focused on our own path without comparing ourselves to others? Could we be calmer and live better, just like the horses? I think so. Here are a few ways to do that:

How To Put On Your Blinders:

1. Compare yourself to yourself. Instead of measuring yourself against others, rate your progress with yourself, just like the Broadway dancer. What’s better about you now than say, a year or two ago? Are you a better listener or a better photographer? Ask yourself, “In what ways have I improved from before?”

2. Notice what you judge. It’s human nature to measure your progress on things you can see like jobs, money or relationships. But success is just as much about internal qualities like wisdom or strength. Ask yourself, “How have I grown inside?”

3. Rethink the meaning of “losing.” There will always be things in life that someone else gets instead of you: the gold medal, the big promotion, the cute guy. But the mere pursuit of what you want has its own rewards. Maybe now you’re more persistent or more sure of your values than you were before. Ask yourself, “Who have I become in the process of striving for what I want?”

For me, I’ve found that putting on the blinders helps me remember that the race is only with myself. And that’s made all the difference.

How can you put on blinders in your own life? I’d love to know.

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